Tag: Education


Dear Hollywoodãor How To Pick A University

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Birdman. Michael Keaton, some other people you might have heard of. The trailers make it look really interesting, the story of a washed-up superhero who was never more than second-rate being dragged out of retirement by popular demand. That could be funny. Only that has nothing whatsoever with the movie. It’s really about a washed-up… Read more »

Doctoring Lessons

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Last night, I taught my first ever psychology/sociology class to MCAT students. As many of you probably do not know, the MCAT—the Medical College Admissions Test—is adding for 2015 a brand new content section on psychology and sociology in which they expect incoming medical students to have taken at least one semester of introductory psychology… Read more »

I Can’t Do Math…or Can I?

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Math is not my subject. In high school, my average in math was lowest, although surprisingly, my highest average was in the sciences. I “got” physics, in spite of the math, because there, the math made sense. In the abstract, it sent my brain reeling. More than once, my mother had to call my math… Read more »

The Dilemma of Our Time

Evolution is a constant in the human experience, although we interpret it in different manners. To some, particularly scientists, evolution is an accidental progression that yielded the cosmos, our planet and life. To others, it is a process created by a supreme being as part of a master plan. Regardless of our beliefs, life in… Read more »

Existential Roundup

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Photo by David Shankbone. Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. The end of the summer is almost upon us and that back-to-school feeling is in the air, much to the chagrin of students (and… Read more »

Learning Across Boundaries – The ISSS-2014 Conference in Washington, D.C.

The 58th meeting of the International Society for the Systems Sciences was held George Washington University, in Washington, D.C.  Gerald Midgley  president for this year, and his conference team, are to be commended for creating a great week of learning.  The theme of the conference was “Learning Across Boundaries: Exploring the variety of systemic theory and practice.”  That theme was reflected… Read more »

The Evolutionary Journey of Life

Life is a journey. I have been keenly aware of that for a good portion of my life.  I guess I became aware of the power of the metaphor in my early twenties when I broke away from some cultural patterns that diverted me from what a friend called “the franchised life” — that more… Read more »

Seeing Beyond Boundaries that Divide Us in Our Quest for Social Justice for ALL – Part 1

July is usually a rather reflective month for me as I embrace yet another year of progression in age with a deep sense of gratitude for the gift of life. The past two weeks have particularly been reflective and thought-provoking for me as I seek to gain deeper insights on a variety of things. These… Read more »

Conversations About the Future Systems Research

There is a long connection between Saybrook and systems conversations, which continues to this day.  The semi-annual conversations have been hosted by the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and were historically known as the Fuschl Conversations (due to their location at Fuschl am See in Austria). Bela Banathy, the founder of the systems program… Read more »

Individuals and Human Systems: Searching for Knowledge Between the Disciplines

I walk in two worlds though neither is home. My work and education are based in and on human systems and psychology. I’m drawn to both for a sense and deeper understanding about when, how, and if people connect.  The energy from groups has been a positive reinforcement for me that people co-create and deliver… Read more »