Author: Kirk Schneider


Reflections on Zombies Before Todayês Apocalypse

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George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead The current fascination with zombies and the Zombie Apocalypse seems to clearly reflect of some of the deep-seated concerns with American culture. In his book, Horror and the Holy, Kirk Schneider suggests that monsters often represent two human extremes: constriction and expansion. Dracula embodies Hyper-constriction (deadening qualities) as… Read more »

Expansion-Constriction

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Image by John Pierce (click image for animation) I want to share a conceptual continuum created by Kirk Schneider, PhD, a leading writer and theorist in the existential-humanistic psychology community. In his book Existential-Integrative Psychotherapy, Schneider (2008) explains that a main focus of existential psychotherapy for many practitioners and theorists is the human experience of… Read more »

The Challenge of Reaching Everybody: Existential-Humanistic Psychology and the Ties that Bind

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Photo from German Federal Archives. This is the first in a series of four articles that will explore Tom Greening’s (1992) Existential Challenges and Responses. I will explore one existential challenge in each article with the intent of contextualizing that challenge to contemporary issues through a personal lens. My aim is to demonstrate that existential… Read more »

Rollo May’s last book, The Psychology of Existence, re-issued. An interview with co-author Kirk Schneider

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Kirk Schneider Recently McGraw-Hill announced it was reissuing the seminal 1995 text The Psychology of Existence, by Kirk Schneider and Rollo May.  It was the last book May ever wrote, and he edited a galley copy just two days before his death. Psychology of Existence was intended to be a foundational book for the revitalization of… Read more »

Kirk Schneider to discuss ‘The Polarized Mind’ on KQED’s radio Forum

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It’s not our problems that are killing us, says Saybrook faculty member Kirk Schneider:  it’s our minds.  We can’t solve problems ranging from global warming to Wall Street malfeasance because we are caught in a mental trap – what he calls “the polarized mind.”   Schneider will be discussing his new book “The Polarized Mind:… Read more »